Rafting:

D&B: Complete 8

J&C: Complete 9

S&A: Complete 10


White water rafting can be a wonderful adventure activity if you have planned for it correctly. Here are some activities to get you started


1) The first step in planning your rafting adventure is to contact a professional certified rafting outfitter.
Read online reviews, call around, ask questions like “How long has your company been in business?” “What type of training do your guides have?” “Does your company have the proper permits?”
These questions are important for the safety of your group.
*After contacting a certified rafting outfitter it’s time to plan your rafting adventure.
Your outfitter will give you a list of equipment that you should bring with you. The list can include
• Bathing Suit
• T-shirt
• Sun block and lip balm
• Sunglasses
• Eye Glass Straps
• Old Sneakers, neoprene booties, or river shoes
• Waterproof Camera
• Energy Bar for the river
• Water or Gatorade
• Small Dry Bag
• Zip Lock Baggies
• Towel or towels
• Plastic Bag(s)
• Change of Clothes
2) What is the purpose of each of these items?


*Let's discuss the equipment that you will use when you raft

 

3) What are the differences in rubber, plastic, and Kevlar rafts?
Discuss the safety and durability of each type.


4) When rafting you can choose to use paddles or oars. Together with your group discuss and decide which best suits your needs.

 

There are 6 degrees of difficulty when it comes to rafting
Class 1: Very small rough areas, might require slight maneuvering. (Skill level: Very basic) Class 2: Some rough water, maybe some rocks, might require some maneuvering. (Skill level:
Basic paddling skill)
Class 3: Small waves, maybe a small drop, but no considerable danger. May require significant maneuvering. (Skill level: Some experience in rafting)
Class 4: Whitewater, medium waves, maybe rocks, maybe a considerable drop, sharp maneuvers may be needed. (Skill level: Exceptional rafting experience)
Class 5: Whitewater, large waves, large volume, possibility of large rocks and hazards, possibility of a large drop, requires precise maneuvering. (Skill level: Full mastery of rafting)
Class 6: Class 6 rapids are so dangerous that they are effectively unnavigable on a reliably safe basis. Rafters can expect to encounter substantial whitewater, huge waves, huge rocks and hazards, and/or substantial drops that will impart severe impacts beyond the structural capacities and impact ratings of almost all rafting equipment. Traversing a Class 6 rapid has a dramatically increased likelihood of ending in serious injury or death compared to lesser classes. (Skill level: Full mastery of rafting, and even then, it may not be safe)


5) Locate a few photos or videos of each of the 6 classes of rapids. Discuss the skill level of your group and decide on which class you think best suits your skill levels.


*Risks in white water rafting stem from both environmental dangers and from improper behavior.


*Environmental dangers


6) Define each of the following and discus how to identify them and the dangers of each
Hydraulics or keeper hydraulics Strainers
Dams
undercut rocks
high waterfalls


*Improper preparation or behavioral dangers

 

7) Discuss each of the following and what you and your group can do to prevent these things from happening.
Drowning
Hypothermia
Overexertion
Smashing into rocks
Getting hit by paddles Getting stuck in river features
Now that you have a better idea of what to expect on your rafting trip it’s time to plan.

 

8) Where are you planning on going?
When are you looking to go on your trip?
What is the length of the trip?
What is your trip budget?


9) Go rafting!!!
With your certified outfitter and all the knowledge that you gained in steps 1-7 along with training from your outfitter, go have a rafting adventure.


10) After your trip, together with your group, make a small scrapbook or journal of the trip. Share it with friends, family, or members of a younger group.

Rafting:

D&B: Complete 8

J&C: Complete 9

S&A: Complete 10

White water rafting can be a wonderful adventure activity if you have planned for it correctly. Here are some activities to get you started


1) The first step in planning your rafting adventure is to contact a professional certified rafting outfitter.
Read online reviews, call around, ask questions like “How long has your company been in business?” “What type of training do your guides have?” “Does your company have the proper permits?”
These questions are important for the safety of your group.
*After contacting a certified rafting outfitter it’s time to plan your rafting adventure.
Your outfitter will give you a list of equipment that you should bring with you. The list can include
• Bathing Suit
• T-shirt
• Sun block and lip balm
• Sunglasses
• Eye Glass Straps
• Old Sneakers, neoprene booties, or river shoes
• Waterproof Camera
• Energy Bar for the river
• Water or Gatorade
• Small Dry Bag
• Zip Lock Baggies
• Towel or towels
• Plastic Bag(s)
• Change of Clothes
2) What is the purpose of each of these items?


*Let's discuss the equipment that you will use when you raft

3) What are the differences in rubber, plastic, and Kevlar rafts?
Discuss the safety and durability of each type.


4) When rafting you can choose to use paddles or oars. Together with your group discuss and decide which best suits your needs.

There are 6 degrees of difficulty when it comes to rafting
Class 1: Very small rough areas, might require slight maneuvering. (Skill level: Very basic) Class 2: Some rough water, maybe some rocks, might require some maneuvering. (Skill level:
Basic paddling skill)
Class 3: Small waves, maybe a small drop, but no considerable danger. May require significant maneuvering. (Skill level: Some experience in rafting)
Class 4: Whitewater, medium waves, maybe rocks, maybe a considerable drop, sharp maneuvers may be needed. (Skill level: Exceptional rafting experience)
Class 5: Whitewater, large waves, large volume, possibility of large rocks and hazards, possibility of a large drop, requires precise maneuvering. (Skill level: Full mastery of rafting)
Class 6: Class 6 rapids are so dangerous that they are effectively unnavigable on a reliably safe basis. Rafters can expect to encounter substantial whitewater, huge waves, huge rocks and hazards, and/or substantial drops that will impart severe impacts beyond the structural capacities and impact ratings of almost all rafting equipment. Traversing a Class 6 rapid has a dramatically increased likelihood of ending in serious injury or death compared to lesser classes. (Skill level: Full mastery of rafting, and even then, it may not be safe)


5) Locate a few photos or videos of each of the 6 classes of rapids. Discuss the skill level of your group and decide on which class you think best suits your skill levels.


*Risks in white water rafting stem from both environmental dangers and from improper behavior.


*Environmental dangers


6) Define each of the following and discus how to identify them and the dangers of each
Hydraulics or keeper hydraulics Strainers
Dams
undercut rocks
high waterfalls


*Improper preparation or behavioral dangers

7) Discuss each of the following and what you and your group can do to prevent these things from happening.
Drowning
Hypothermia
Overexertion
Smashing into rocks
Getting hit by paddles Getting stuck in river features
Now that you have a better idea of what to expect on your rafting trip it’s time to plan.

8) Where are you planning on going?
When are you looking to go on your trip?
What is the length of the trip?
What is your trip budget?


9) Go rafting!!!
With your certified outfitter and all the knowledge that you gained in steps 1-7 along with training from your outfitter, go have a rafting adventure.


10) After your trip, together with your group, make a small scrapbook or journal of the trip. Share it with friends, family, or members of a younger group.

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